Davis School District installs district-wide surveillance system

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CLEARFIELD — The Davis School District now has a 24-hour monitoring center, where it can monitor cameras and conditions in 120 buildings.

This is part of a major security upgrade ahead of the new school year.

Years ago, the Building Controls Monitoring Center was about the size of a closet, but after upgrades it is much more complex.

How you react in the first moments of an incident can have a major impact on damage, injury and, in the worst case scenario, loss of life.

“We looked at Parkland a lot, Uvalde definitely. We’ve made adjustments to our procedures and functions since then as a district,” said Justin Mott, control center manager.

He said those are all things they have in mind when refining how things work here.

“We are always tweaking something. Nothing beats a strict rule. We have to change and adapt,” he added.

Someone will be at the center 24 hours a day, every day of the year.

The Davis School District now has a 24-hour monitoring center, where it can monitor cameras and conditions in 120 buildings.
The Davis School District now has a 24-hour monitoring center, where it can monitor cameras and conditions in 120 buildings. (Photo: Mike Anderson, KSL-TV)

Mott said, “We have certain areas throughout the district where we know we have frequent issues, whether it’s trespassing or vandalism that we’re keeping tabs on.”

Even maintenance issues can be detected and dispatched from the center.

Mott said, “We have a very good working relationship with all of our local law enforcement.”

With eyes now district-wide, the district can use the center to help make calls on sunny days.

“Whether it’s wind or snow, we’re kind of watching that here. We’re updating our administration so they can make those decisions early,” Mott added.

Monitors can shut down systems from here, even lock down buildings. It’s something Mott said that will keep getting better just in case one of those worst-case scenarios happens here.

“We’re working to coordinate and work with schools on drills, whether it’s fire drills or lockdown drills, that sort of thing, we’re always preparing and training,” he said. declared.

All upgrades were done in the district with maintenance workers. The cost was around $50,000.

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mike anderson

Mike Anderson is often his own photographer, filming and editing most of his stories. He arrived at KSL in April 2011 after working for several years in various media outlets.

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